Top 4 Engineering Careers for 2019

Aerospace Engineer

While you immediately think of airplanes, aerospace engineers also work on multidisciplinary teams, engineering, design, develop and test spaceships, aircraft and missiles, and using knowledge spanning aerodynamics, avionics, propulsion, and materials science. Generally this requires years of experience, but not necessarily. This does require at least a related bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions. This position can require security clearance. This field can be either in private or public spheres, with both having a wide variety of openings.

Do you have the skills companies are looking for? Check here.

Electrical Engineer

Although they work in fields closely related to computers, electrical engineers develop electrical equipment involved in generating power, including controlling and transmitting. They are required to have in-depth scientific understanding about electricity and technology in various products and services. Electrical engineering encompasses power systems, communication, and can include industrial robot control, aviation, microprocessors, and digital broadcasting.

Software Engineer

Surprisingly, software engineers have to focus on more than just testing the software. There is evaluating the software, with both a variety of automated and manual tests, showing if the software is doing as it’s expected. After running the tests, software test design engineers write up reports detailing the progress and outcome. This is crucial for any company to decide how to proceed. Software test design engineers also have to collaborate with others, both with developers at the beginning of the project to offer input on the potential pros and cons of structuring a program.

Along all the steps on the way, software test design engineers make suggestions regarding changes, improvements, and alternative to try. As part of their job, experienced software test engineers get called upon to monitor the work of technicians and other testers. This position requires paying great attention to detail and at least a bachelor’s degree in software engineering, computer science, or a similar field.

Should you take a contract position? Check here

Quality Industrial Mechanical Engineers

Being a mechanical engineers means spending your time designing, developing, and manufacturing tools, machines, manufacturing systems, engines, and other mechanical devices.

Mechanical engineers focus on how things work and ways in which to improve old devices and systems so that the machines run at optimal levels of efficiency and productivity. Mechanical engineering is the broadest of the engineering specialties, in that they work in a variety of areas, including production operations, manufacturing, agriculture, maintenance, sales, and possibly even administration and management.

USPRO staffs for all of these positions and shows openings at jobs.uspro.net

Tips For Getting Your Security Clearance

As a contractor, it can be very rewarding to pursue and obtain a security clearance. This helps differentiate you from your competition, and many non-government employers find it helpful in gauging whether you are a trustworthy and committed employee. Here are a few tips to help you ensure you have what you need to get cleared.

3 Tips To Get Your Security Clearance


1. Keep Track of Where You’ve Been …

Traveling outside of the U.S. is good for your broader employment experience and education, but it’s important to have all that information logged somewhere you can refer to as you go through the background searches required for security clearance. Extensive time abroad can, in fact, lengthen the clearance process.

All time spent outside of the US in the last ten years must be reported (unless you were on US government business). Record the day, month, and year when you begin and end a trip. Keeping up with where you live is just as important as travel, especially if you stayed in a place for 90 or more days. Document all your addresses and maintain the contact information of your landlord to use as a reference as well.

Keeping track as you go will help you accurately recount these details without having to chase them down when time is of the essence. Even if you spend time in a place without formal street addresses (such as Peace Corps service in a remote village), write down any indicators that will enable an investigator to confirm your information.

2.   …And Who You Know

The people you have relationships with, especially while abroad, can also impact your clearance process. Hiring agencies researching your clearance case need to know about all your interactions with non-US citizens. As you build relationships with people from outside the country, make a note of the day, month and year when you began contact, as well as your most recent contact with them. As much as possible, research their affiliations with foreign governments or employers. If you have a member of your immediate family serve as a consultant, intern or employee for a foreign agency, you will need to disclose those contacts and contracts.

While this can be especially difficult if you travel extensively, or if you have family or friends living abroad, focus on those with whom you have had the closest ties or most interaction with over the last seven years. That will give the researchers the information they need as they clearance process proceeds.

3. Maintain Relationships

An important part of background investigations are built on gathering information to determine whether you are a reliable, trustworthy individual, of good conduct and character, and loyal to the U.S. That means that your security clearance depends heavily on the relationships you have with friends, colleagues, roommates, or other associates whose combined association with you covers at least the last seven years. These individuals will be called on to speak knowledgeably about you, your character, and your activities. They cannot be family members, and ideally, they should currently live in the U.S.

When preparing for a security clearance background check, select people from different parts of your life and career. These individuals should speak to your conduct outside of the U.S. as well as here at home. If it’s needed, prepare your contacts by reminding them of when you first met, what activities you did together, and what you’ve been doing since you met. That little extra preparation can help make sure they are ready to answer the questions the background check will require them to answer accurately and fully.

Are you looking for your next job?

For more advice on how to get the clearances and skills you need to succeed as a contractor, connect with the team at US PRO today an explore these available opportunities.

Outdated Browser Warning

You are using an outdated browser.

Please upgrade your browser to view this page.